Friday, March 28, 2014

A Crimean coincidence or 5.45x39mm is rumored to have been banned by the ATF

It all started with a Facebook post from the infamous James Yeager.......



And by this afternoon, the panic had set in.  Military surplus 5.45x39mm has been flying off of the shelves (though I have a bit, I bought some more myself).  The formidable hivemind at Ar15.com researched the hell out of this.  One guy even called the BATFE and confirmed what folks were saying; that apparently once some, anyone builds a "pistol" (AR or AK pistol in this case) that can shoot imported steel core ammunition or "Armor Piercing", that steel core ammunition will be banned.  You see, that's part of the "for sporting purposes only" language in the Second Amendment, folks.  The BATFE is operating on some sort of reality distortion field where steel core ammo made in the US is fine but imported steel core ammo is evil......

  Copes confirmed the sad reality of this as did AIMSurplus (both posting on AR15.com).

  Reports abounded like the below:


AIM sold 440 cans within 1/2 hr. 

USAC, who claims to be the retail arm of a major importer, had well over 1500 tins listed this morning and now show out of stock.

  
Folks, this is bad.  The non-logic of this hurts the head.  I can name at least one good dude (a friend) who was planning to build a small business around 5.45x39mm AR15s.  Ask yourself "what is the point of this?  Is it not just a back door towards disallowing more firearms and ammunition to the American people?"

I know it sounds paranoid but I don't think this happening on the wake of the Crimean crisis is a coincidence......  However, following the letter of the law as seen below, the BATFE is technically right except, did anyone tell them that 5.45x39 is .21 caliber?

(B) The term “armor piercing ammunition” means—
(i) a projectile or projectile core which may be used in a handgun and which is constructed entirely (excluding the presence of traces of other substances) from one or a combination of tungsten alloys, steel, iron, brass, bronze, beryllium copper, or depleted uranium; or (ii) a full jacketed projectile larger than .22 caliber designed and intended for use in a handgun and whose jacket has a weight of more than 25 percent of the total weight of the projectile.
The prohibition that this definition applies to is:

It shall be unlawful:

(7) for any person to manufacture or import armor piercing ammunition, unless--(A) the manufacture of such ammunition is for the use of the United States, any department or agency of the United States, any State, or any department, agency, or political subdivision of a State;(B) the manufacture of such ammunition is for the purpose of exportation; or(C) the manufacture or importation of such ammunition is for the purpose of testing or experimentation and has been authorized by the Attorney General;(8) for any manufacturer or importer to sell or deliver armor piercing ammunition, unless such sale or delivery--(A) is for the use of the United States, any department or agency of the United States, any State, or any department, agency, or political subdivision of a State;(B) is for the purpose of exportation; or(C) is for the purpose of testing or experimentation and has been authorized by the Attorney General;

Right now, AR15.com is on a witch hunt to see which genius manufacturer "manufactured" a 5.45x39mm pistol and have zeroed in on JBI Armory, who sure enough advertises 5.45x39mm and 7.62x39mm "pistols."  


5 comments:

  1. "The BATFE is operating on some sort of reality distortion field where steel core ammo made in the US is fine but imported steel core ammo is evil......"

    Domestic steel core isn't fine either, there's just a specific exemption for military surplus 5.56 and .30-'06. I think (and I'm not 100% certain) that these rounds are exempted for DCM/CMP reasons.

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  2. I am really glad I didn't get that AK74 now.

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  3. You missed the "or" between section (i) and (ii). If the core is made of steel, they can classify it as armor piercing

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  4. Yeager sure does work hard to maintain his reputation.

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